Breaking Ice

The pace of technological, social, and environmental change in Canada's Arctic has profound effects on resource management and policy decisions. The chapters in this volume result from a project undertaken by the Ocean Management Research Network that examines the nature of Arctic environmental evolution and sustainability. From the pressures of development, technological advances, globalization, and climate change to social and cultural life, this book attempts to define the nature of competing demands and assess their impact on the environment. Breaking Ice: Renewable Resource and Ocean Management in the Canadian North provide a detailed examination of ocean and coastal management in the Canadian north, exploring a wide range of issues critical to environmental stewardship and breaking the ice to connect academics, government managers, policy-makers, aboriginal groups, and industry.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Breaking Ice 1
Untitled 4
Contents 6
List of Figures 9
List of Tables 11
List of Boxes 13
List of Acronyms 14
Preface and Acknowledgments 18
1 Introduction 20
Section I: UNDERSTANDING THE ISSUES: LEARNING FROM EXPERIENCE 40
2 Feeding the family in times of change 42
3 Sustainability and vulnerability: Aboriginal Arctic food security in a toxic world 66
4 Ecosystem-based management and marine environmental quality indicators in northern Canada 90
5 Integrated management planning in Canada's western Arctic: An adaptive consultation process 114
6 Marine stewardship and Canada's Oceans Agenda in the western Canadian Arctic: A role for youth 138
Section II: RESPONDING AND ADAPTING TO NEW CHALLENGES 158
7 A place for traditional ecological knowledge in resource management 160
8 Understanding and communicating about ecological change: Denesoline indicators of ecosystem health 184
9 Wildlife tourism at the edge of chaos: Complex interactions between humans and polar bears in Churchill, Manitoba 202
10 Economic Development Based on Local Resources: Commercial Harvesting of Caribou on Southampton Island 222
Section III: RESILIENCE AND INSTITUTIONS 242
11 Cross-scale institutions and building resilience in the Canadian North 244
12 Adaptive co-management of Arctic char in Nunavut Territory 268
13 Unpacking social learning in social-ecological systems: Case studies of polar bear and narwhal management in northern Canada 288
14 Exploring the roles of law and hierarchy in ideas of resilience: Regulating resource harvesting in Nunavut 310
Section IV: GOVERNANCE, POLICY, AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS 336
15 Return of the "Vikings": The Canadian-Danish dispute over Hans Island – new challenges for the control of the Canadian North 338
16 Issues, priorities, and research directions for oceans management in Canada's North 356
17 Conclusion: Integration, innovation, and participation 382
List of Authors 393
A 396
Index 396
B 397
C 398
D 401
E 402
F 402
H 403
G 403
I 404
J 406
L 406
K 406
M 407
N 408
O 409
Q 410
P 410
R 411
S 411
T 413
V 414
U 414
Y 415
Z 415
W 415